From Basel to Karlsruhe, through Alsace and the German vineyards.From Basel to Karlsruhe, through Alsace and the German vineyards.From Basel to Karlsruhe, through Alsace and the German vineyards.From Basel to Karlsruhe, through Alsace and the German vineyards.From Basel to Karlsruhe, through Alsace and the German vineyards.From Basel to Karlsruhe, through Alsace and the German vineyards.From Basel to Karlsruhe, through Alsace and the German vineyards.From Basel to Karlsruhe, through Alsace and the German vineyards.

From Basel to Karlsruhe, through Alsace and the German vineyards.

From the Swiss border onwards, the Rhine forms a natural border between France and Germany, Alsace and Baden-Wurttemberg, the Vosges and the Black Forest. The Rhine cycle route follows the two banks over almost 200 kilometres, alongside nature reserves and hydroelectric works, passing through the picturesque Alsace villages, visiting Strasbourg, the capital of Europe, before entering Karlsruhe.

Along the French side, the Rhine cycle route begins, in a South-North direction, at the level of Huningue, near Basel, and follows the Rhine-Rhone Canal, passing through the “Petite Camargue” nature reserve and the Hardt forest before reaching the village of Ottmarsheim, known for its famous Romanesque church. [...]

Deviation between Hartheim and Breisach until the end of June 2016.

Deviation between Kappel und Wittenweier until 31st of December 2016. More info here.

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After Artzenheim, a large part of the route passes through the countryside, which does not stop cyclists from making a detour to the large Alsace towns of Mulhouse and Colmar, easily accessible via connecting trails. The route is dotted with a dozen locks and small characteristic churches until it reaches Strasbourg, the capital of Europe, listed as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO with its numerous historical monuments. By the high-water dyke and the village of La Wantzenau, reputed for its restaurants, the route runs very close to the enormous fish ladder of Gambsheim and passes through alluvial forests and nature reserves. Beyond Sessenheim, where Goethe stayed, the small town of Lauterbourg is the last stage of the Rhine cycle route in Alsace.

 

On the German side, the Rhine cycle route joins Basel to Karlsruhe by passing through the Markgräfler Land, a renowned wine-growing region, following the example of the Kaiserstuhl hills, located a few kilometres from Freiburg im Breisgau. The Rhine cycle route crosses the warmest and sunniest area of Germany along tracks that are mainly flat. After passing Europa-Park in Rust, cyclists reach Rastatt, a town on the edge of the Rhine whose historical Baroque monuments, such as the residence of the Margrave Louis-William of Baden and the remains of the fortification dating back to the Baden Revolution, provide examples of its eventful history. Finally, the EV15 enters Karlsruhe, a very young town whose first stone was laid on 17th June 1715, with the construction of the castle which became the new residence of the Margrave Charles William of Baden-Durlach.

 

  • 200
    LENGHT
    km
  • 883 km
    may be used for
    transporting goods
  • 1233 km
    Length of
    the Rhine

 

  • Europa Park in Rust

    There is loads to discover at Germany’s largest amusement park: in an area of 94 hectares, adventurous visitors can look forward not only to more than 100 attractions and international show programmes, but also to 13 European themed areas with architecture, vegetation and gastronomy typical of the respective countries – pure enjoyment in summer and winter alike!

  • Strasbourg : the capital of Europe

    A symbol of French-German reconciliation and European unity, Strasbourg is considered to be the capital of Europe due to the presence of several European Union and other institutions in the city. With it being the home in particular of the European Parliament, the European Council and the European Court of Human Rights, Strasbourg is one of the rare cities, together with New York and Geneva, to house international institutions without it actually being the capital of a state itself.

  • Strasbourg: Tomi Ungerer Museum

    Artist and illustrator of books for readers of all ages, including the children's book “The Three Robbers”, Tomi Ungerer, who was born in Strasbourg in 1931, is considered to be one of the greatest illustrators of the last 50 years. The 700 square meter museum – the first public museum in France devoted to an artist during his lifetime – has been established in the Greiner Villa and houses more than 11000 drawings donated by the artist to his home city.

  • Notre Dame of Neunkirch - Places of pilgrimage

    The oldest written mention of Neunkirch is from the 13th century. Its location, far away from busy main roads, makes this site a haven of peace, quiet and rejuvenation. It became a pilgrimage site after a statuette of the Virgin Mary was found here. Legend has it that the statuette was found by a shepherd and taken away nine times, but that the statuette always came back to its original location.

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  • Not realised
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The countries

The stages