Natural heritageNatural heritageNatural heritageNatural heritageNatural heritageNatural heritageNatural heritageNatural heritage

Natural heritage

At the start of the 19th century, the Rhine's flow changed with each rising, creating and destroying islands and peninsulas, supplying humid zones and marshes. This large river took several meanderings, divided into several branches and sometimes spread over several kilometres in width. At this time, the ecosystem developed according to the whims of the river. Salmon swam upstream to spawn and the alluvial forests were created along the edge of the river. But in order to protect the villages from flooding, sanitize the marshes, ensure a better flow of the rising waters, and recover new land for farming, the River Rhine has been gradually tamed and canalised, further to significant development work. Nowadays, several nature reserves have been opened and maintain some of the last natural landscapes of the River Rhine. Don't miss them!

  • Rhäzuns

    The alluvial areas between Rothenbrunnen and Reichenau constitute one of the Rhine's last natural river-side landscapes upstream from Lake Constance. One characteristic of the alluvial landscape is its constant transformation. Subject to the whims of floods and droughts, it evolves every year. Alluvial deposits are taken away or left, new islands and new meanders are formed, providing a wide variety of habitats for plants and animals.

  • The horticultural region of Betuwe

    Between the two main Rhine Delta rivers, the Waal to the south and Nederrijn to the north, is the horticultural region of Betuwe. It is above all known for its pear and cherry tree orchards. The delta's rich alluvial deposits make the area ideal for horticulture.

  • The North Sea and the dunes

    Awaiting cyclists at the end of the EuroVelo 15 route is the little seaside resort of Hoek van Holland - today a part of Rotterdam. The long beaches are perfect for a gentle walk and the dunes are awaiting discovery. Here again are unique plants deserving protection that visitors should take care not to trample on. Now it really is time to rest one's legs and relax.

  • Kühkopf-Knoblochsaue nature reserve in Riedstadt.

    Covering an area of 24 square kilometres, Kühkopf-Knoblochsaue is the largest nature reserve in the State of Hesse. It is home to exceptional flora and fauna, including bush willow, reed beds and Kühkopf island, surrounded by an ancient branch of the Rhine. This nature reserve gives us a good idea of what the Rhine area looked like before its banks were developed by Man.

Les pays

Les etapes

Conseils de voyage