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United Kingdom

Over a thousand years ago, pilgrims used to travel all the way from England to Rome, among them Sigeric the Serious Archbishop of Canterbury did it to receive his symbols from the Pope. Now you can follow their footsteps by taking our 3,900km long version of the route: EuroVelo 5 – Via Romea (Francigena).The route follows the path of the National Cycle Network, a 14,000 mile network of signed cycle routes crossing the length and breadth of the country.

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France

There are two parts of EuroVelo 5 in France. After leaving England, the cycle route meanders through northern France, from Calais to Wattrelos. Coming from Belgium and Luxembourg over Sarreguemines, the second part will take you through the picturesque regions of Moselle and Alsace before heading to Switzerland. After passing the city of Mulhouse, the EuroVelo 5 joins up the junction of three EuroVelo routes - EuroVelo 5, 6 and 15 - in Huningue-Basel. EuroVelo 5 totals 660 km in France.

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Belgium

The itinerary of the EuroVelo 5- Via Romea Francigena in Belgium, will introduce you to the rich natural, architectural, cultural and brewing heritage of the country. After cycling along the Roubaix canal in France you will enter the Belgian territory. The itinerary will lead you through calm roads, canal locks, drawbridges, natural parks, the picturesque villages of the Pajottenland, the forests of Soignes, various villages build out of limestone, all the well known monuments of Brussels and many more beautiful places in Belgium. It will enable you to discover all the sides, Belgium has to offer on a bike.

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Luxembourg

The Grand Duchy of Luxembourg welcomes the EuroVelo 5 for a 107 km stretch which follows the national network of dedicated cycle paths from the Belgian border, through the stunning cliff-top capital city, towards the French and German borders at Schengen, symbolic centre of Europe and home to the European museum. Cycling in Luxembourg is a pleasant experience due to the countries high quality touristic infrastructure, little traffic on its cycle paths and a splendid nature. Currently, Lxembourg has a national network of cycling routes extending over 600 km.

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Germany

The EuroVelo 5- Via Romea (Francigena) in Germany is only 80 km long.The route leads the cyclists through the beautiful German federal states of Saarland and Rhineland-Palatinate. On this short section of the EuroVelo 5, they have the opportunity to take in the impressive countryside and the beautiful river valleys southwestern Germany has to offer. Shortly after crossing the French-German border, the cyclists will arrive in the beautiful town of Saarbrücken. After passing this city, the cyclists will cycle along some minor cities, towns and wine villages, which are located along the river Saar, before crossing the border with Luxembourg.

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Switzerland

The EuroVelo 5 route in Switzerland (National North–South Route No. 3) leads through the large scenic Swiss regions of the Jura, Mittelland, Central Switzerland and over the Alps to the south. Lovely, peaceful landscapes of the Baselbieter Jura. Thrilling ride down to Aarau. Off the beaten track through flat Suhrental, joining the stream of tourists in Luzern. A complex water: the grandiose Vierwaldstättersee. Closely harried by traffic over the Teufelsbrücke bridge towards the Gotthard, the south beckons with a racy downhill ride. The climate changes, first granite, soon chestnut trees and vineyards, Bellinzona «La Turita» a glimpse of the vegetable garden of Magadino. Lago di Lugano with photogenic Morcote, at the end, the Mendrisiotto.

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Italy

Via Francigena was a major pilgrimage and communication corridor in medieval Western Europe used to reach Rome, and from there Jerusalem through the port of Brindisi, from the Kingdom of the Franks. It was a “bridge of cultures between Anglo-Saxon and Latin Europe” that contributed to shape the European identity (Le Goff). Declared Cultural Route of the Council of Europe in 1994, The Via Francigena began to be rediscovered and promoted for contemporary hikers. It is based on the travel diary of the Archbishop of Canterbury Sigeric – who noted the places where he stopped on his way back from Rome to Canterbury in 990 – and it inspired the cultural cycle route EuroVelo 5.

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