From Basel to Karlsruhe, through Alsace and the German vineyards.From Basel to Karlsruhe, through Alsace and the German vineyards.From Basel to Karlsruhe, through Alsace and the German vineyards.From Basel to Karlsruhe, through Alsace and the German vineyards.From Basel to Karlsruhe, through Alsace and the German vineyards.From Basel to Karlsruhe, through Alsace and the German vineyards.From Basel to Karlsruhe, through Alsace and the German vineyards.From Basel to Karlsruhe, through Alsace and the German vineyards.

From Basel to Karlsruhe, through Alsace and the German vineyards.

From the Swiss border onwards, the Rhine forms a natural border between France and Germany, Alsace and Baden-Wurttemberg, the Vosges and the Black Forest. The Rhine cycle route follows the two banks over almost 200 kilometres, alongside nature reserves and hydroelectric works, passing through the picturesque Alsace villages, visiting Strasbourg, the capital of Europe, before entering Karlsruhe.

Along the French side, the Rhine cycle route begins, in a South-North direction, at the level of Huningue, near Basel, and follows the Rhine-Rhone Canal, passing through the “Petite Camargue” nature reserve and the Hardt forest before reaching the village of Ottmarsheim, known for its famous Romanesque church. [...]

Deviation between Hartheim and Breisach until the end of June 2016.

Deviation between Kappel und Wittenweier until 31st of December 2016. More info here.

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After Artzenheim, a large part of the route passes through the countryside, which does not stop cyclists from making a detour to the large Alsace towns of Mulhouse and Colmar, easily accessible via connecting trails. The route is dotted with a dozen locks and small characteristic churches until it reaches Strasbourg, the capital of Europe, listed as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO with its numerous historical monuments. By the high-water dyke and the village of La Wantzenau, reputed for its restaurants, the route runs very close to the enormous fish ladder of Gambsheim and passes through alluvial forests and nature reserves. Beyond Sessenheim, where Goethe stayed, the small town of Lauterbourg is the last stage of the Rhine cycle route in Alsace.

 

On the German side, the Rhine cycle route joins Basel to Karlsruhe by passing through the Markgräfler Land, a renowned wine-growing region, following the example of the Kaiserstuhl hills, located a few kilometres from Freiburg im Breisgau. The Rhine cycle route crosses the warmest and sunniest area of Germany along tracks that are mainly flat. After passing Europa-Park in Rust, cyclists reach Rastatt, a town on the edge of the Rhine whose historical Baroque monuments, such as the residence of the Margrave Louis-William of Baden and the remains of the fortification dating back to the Baden Revolution, provide examples of its eventful history. Finally, the EV15 enters Karlsruhe, a very young town whose first stone was laid on 17th June 1715, with the construction of the castle which became the new residence of the Margrave Charles William of Baden-Durlach.

 

  • 200
    LENGHT
    km
  • 883 km
    may be used for
    transporting goods
  • 1233 km
    Length of
    the Rhine

 

  • River navigation museum in Offendorf

    An exhibition held on a Freycinet-type of barge rescued from scrapping, restored and renamed “CABRO”, retraces the evolution of river navigation in Alsace and in particular in Offendorf, the largest village of boatmen in the East of France in the 20th century.

  • Fish ladder in Gambsheim

    Weirs, locks and a fish ladder at Gambsheim. To meet shipping, agricultural and power generation requirements, weirs and hydraulic plants have been built on the River Rhine. These often create obstacles difficult for migrating fish to overcome on their way to their spawning ground. To enable them to reach the Rhine basin, Germany and France signed an agreement in 1997 to construct fish ladders at the hydro-electric plants in Iffezheim and Gambsheim. The Gambsheim fish ladder, opened in 2006, is the largest in Europe. An observation room enables visitors to watch the salmon, eels, trout and river herrings on their way upstream.

  • Sauer Delta Nature Reserve

    The Sauer Delta Conservation Centre is located 100 metres from the River Rhine. It marks the entrance to the largest nature reserve in the Alsace basin, the Seltz Munchhausen reserve or better known as the Sauer Delta Nature Reserve. Located where the River Sauer, a 70-kilometre long river whose source is in the Palatinate, Germany, flows into the Rhine, the nature reserve is home to a biodiversity typical of alluvial plains. To be seen here is a jungle-like forest a phenomenal number of birds.

  • Strasbourg : the capital of Europe

    A symbol of French-German reconciliation and European unity, Strasbourg is considered to be the capital of Europe due to the presence of several European Union and other institutions in the city. With it being the home in particular of the European Parliament, the European Council and the European Court of Human Rights, Strasbourg is one of the rare cities, together with New York and Geneva, to house international institutions without it actually being the capital of a state itself.

  • Realised
  • Not realised
  • Planned

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